Honor Related Violence (Denmark)

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Ghazala Khan, shot to death, Emal Khan, shot twice but survived, September 23, 2005[edit]

Ghazala Khan (1987–23 September 2005) was a Danish‐Pakistani woman, who was shot and killed in Denmark by her brother after she had married against the will of the family. The murder of Ghazala had been ordered by her father to save the family honour, making it a so‐called honour killing. No fewer than nine people from her family took part in arranging and performing the murder and they were all found guilty by Østre Landsret (the High Court of Eastern Denmark) on 27 June 2006 on counts of manslaughter and attempted manslaughter (of her husband). This was a ruling of historic importance, the first time in western Europe that such a large number of family members were found guilty in an "honour killing" case. It is expected that the conviction will serve as precedent throughout Europe for future similar cases and that the sentencing will send a strong signal and have a noticeable preventive effect. Manu Sareen, a youth worker helping girls facing arranged marriage says: "It will have a preventive effect. Some families may abandon similar plans because of today's ruling."

For three years prior to her murder Ghazala had an intimate relationship with her future husband, Emal Khan. However Ghazala, fearing her family's reaction, wished the relationship be kept secret. She eventually revealed her feelings to her mother, who became outraged and beat her, accompanied by her older brother, Akhtar Abbas, the same man who would later shoot her. Emal Khan reports that, after this, Ghazala was locked up inside the house and "frozen out" by the rest of her family, all of whom refused to speak to her or eat with her. Finally, on 5 September 2005 she managed to escape her family and live with Emal. In the period up until her murder they lived with various friends in Denmark. They repeatedly contacted the police for protection, but were denied help. On 21 September they married at the registry office of the small Danish town of Middelfart. Two days later, the family, pretending to want to come to a peaceful reconciliation, convinced the newlywed couple to arrange a meeting at the railway station in Slagelse, where Ghazala's brother shot both Ghazala and Emal Khan. Ghazala was killed instantly. Emal Khan, shot twice in the abdominal region, survived after a lengthy operation.

The court case against the nine persons convicted of the murder of Ghazala was initiated on 15 May 2006. On the 26 June, the court's juridical head instructed the jury that all involved could be convicted based on the evidence presented. On the 27 June, the jury found all of the indicted family members and family friends guilty of conspiracy to commit murder. On 28 June, the sentencing of the nine guilt by the jury was set as follows All persons without Danish citizenship got permanent banishment from Denmark:
Ghazala Khan
Wikipedia, accessed January 23, 2011

17-year old girl, stripped, whipped and strangled with belt, March 5, 2013[edit]

Copenhagen Police arrested four close family members of a 17-year-old girl Tuesday night (March 5th 2013). ... Those arrested are two married couples with Palestinian background - the girl's parents and her aunt and uncle. ... It is a case of honor-related violence, which apparently stems from the fact that the family could not accept that the girl has got a Danish boyfriend.

The girl's parents picked her up Monday at Nørrebro and according to the prosecutor they lured her to come with them to visit some family members in Taastrup (Copenhagen suburb), where other family members waited for her. The father told one of the other family members that he or she was allowed to kill her, and that the father did not want to see her again. Then the girl's parents left, and the girl was ordered to undress, after which she was beaten with a leather belt, got her hair cut off and had a belt tightened around her neck so she could not breathe.

The violence lasted for two hours but stopped, as the 17-year-old succeeded in escaping from the house. She then called the police."