Websites Censored by Islamic Governments

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This page lists all of the nations where it has been confirmed that websites that are critical of Islam have been censored. This is an incomplete list and mentions only certain websites that have been blocked.

Listed by Year[edit]

Year Country Websites Additional information
2014 Malaysia Flag of Malaysia.png Faith Freedom International, Jihad Watch, MundosinIslam.com, Angelfire.com (containing many anti Islamic free webpages) & other religious sites deemed anti-Islamic.
2013 Iran Flag of Iran.png WikiIslam
United Arab Emirates Flag of United Arab Emirates.png WikiIslam
2011 Saudi Arabia Flag of Saudi Arabia.png Faith Freedom International, WikiIslam, Answering Islam, The Religion Of Peace, MuhammadTube & Jihad Watch. All are blocked on the country's pornography blacklist
Iran Flag of Iran.png Jihad Watch, Faith Freedom International & Answering Islam
United Arab Emirates Flag of United Arab Emirates.png Answering Islam, Faith Freedom International, JihadWatch, MuhammadTube, TheReligionofPeace & WikiIslam
Pakistan Flag of Pakistan.png Jihad Watch, MuhammadTube & TheReligionofPeace.
2009 Saudi Arabia Flag of Saudi Arabia.png Faith Freedom International, WikiIslam, & Answering Islam All are blocked on the country's pornography blacklist
Iran Flag of Iran.png Faith Freedom International
United Arab Emirates Flag of United Arab Emirates.png Faith Freedom International
Pakistan Flag of Pakistan.png WikiIslam & Answering Islam
2008 Saudi Arabia Flag of Saudi Arabia.png Faith Freedom International
Iran Flag of Iran.png Faith Freedom International
2007 Saudi Arabia Flag of Saudi Arabia.png Faith Freedom International
Iran Flag of Iran.png Faith Freedom International
Pakistan Flag of Pakistan.png Faith Freedom International
Kuwait Flag of Kuwait.png Faith Freedom International Some ISP level blocks
Indonesia Flag of Indonesia.png Faith Freedom International Some ISP level blocks
2006 Saudi Arabia Flag of Saudi Arabia.png Faith Freedom International
Iran Flag of Iran.png Faith Freedom International
Pakistan Flag of Pakistan.png Faith Freedom International

Screenshots[edit]

Related News Incidents involving Web Freedom[edit]

  • In August 2011, it was reported that more than 900 Danish websites had been hacked by groups from various countries along with individual hackers. Typically, the attacks replaced home pages of "anti-Islam" sites with pro-Islam messages and condemned the publication of "blasphemous images of the Prophet." Noteworthy is the fact that these religious hackers do not find such illegal activity to be contrary to their Islamic beliefs. As one hacker put it, she had achieved her goals "By the grace of God".[1]
  • According to a 2010 survey by the American University of Beirut, around 50% of Arab students are in favour of stricter censorship of the Internet.[2] The survey pool included 2,700 university and high-school students in Lebanon, Jordan and the United Arab Emirates.
  • Malaysia, September 2010, the government formed a task force involving the police, Internet regulators, the information ministry and the attorney general's chambers, to "scour the Internet for blog postings deemed harmful to national unity"[3]
  • Egypt, January 2011, the government ordered service providers to shut down all international connections to the Internet. Every Egyptian provider, every business, bank, Internet cafe, website, school, embassy, and government office that relied on the big four Egyptian ISPs for their Internet connectivity were cut off from the rest of the world for a week.[4]
  • Saudi Arabia, January 2011, in a major internet clamp-down, starting with blogs, forums, news sites, personal websites, electronic archives, chat rooms and online ads, new regulations which would require licences for the operation of an e-publishing site were approved by the Minister of Culture and Information.[5]
  • Turkey, May 2011, the government ordered the banning of the use of 138 words cited as as “indecent” or “provocative”. Words such as “escort”, “goal”, “marriage”, “home”, “shock”, “fire”, “gay”, “prohibited”, “anal”, and the number “31″ are included. Sites containing the offending words will be ordered to close. This will possibly lead to over 120,000 websites in the country being forced to shut down.[6]
  • Tunisia, May 2011, the Tunisian Internet Agency (ATI) is ordered to block all pornographic websites, which became accessible after the lifting of censorship in January.[7]
  • Iran, May 2011, work began on a project for an internal web network that would isolate Iranian users from the worldwide web. Tehran aims for a completely self-sufficient network that would allow it to control the Internet by raising censorship levels to an even higher degree.[8] As of January 2012, over 5 million websites are reportedly blocked in Iran.[9]

See Also[edit]

  • Lists - A hub page that leads to other articles related to Lists
  • Free Speech - A hub page that leads to other articles related to Free Speech

External Links[edit]

  • Anonymouse - Proxy server to view blocked websites

References[edit]

  1. Woman disables anti-Islam websites - Arab News, August 18, 2011
  2. Internet: Survey, half of Arab students favour censorship - ANSAmed, August 6, 2010
  3. Malaysia to monitor Internet for 'harmful' blogs - The Economic Times, September 3, 2010
  4. James Cowie - Egypt Leaves the Internet - Renesys, January 27, 2011
  5. Dean Wilson - Saudi Arabia clamps down on bloggers, news sites, others - TechEye, January 3, 2011
  6. Now Turkey’s Islamist Government Censors Words From Internet! - Un:dhimmi, May 1, 2011 (via Vesti BG)
  7. Tunisia court bans internet porn - Sapa-AFP, May 27, 2011
  8. Iran Working On National Network To Filter Internet - AGI News On, May 28, 2011
  9. Iranian cleric calls Facebook 'un-Islamic', membership a 'sin' - Haaretz, January 7, 2012